Tag Archives: Hurricane Irene

The Insurance Beer Snob Brought to you by KVIS

Bill Jeppe is Kimberley Vassal Insurance’s official Beer Snob. This is a new segment to our blog; Bill Jeppe of Kimberley Vassal Insurance will review a specialty beer every month and give his personal review. This week he reviews the Russian Imperial Stout from Iron Hill located in our very own town of West Chester, P.A.

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Disaster recovery center opens in West Chester

Federal Emergency Management Agency

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A disaster recovery center opened Tuesday in West Chester at the Chester County Government Services Center, 601 Westtown Road, Room 042. The center is a joint effort between the U.S. Federal Emergency Management Agency and the Pennsylvania Emergency Management Agency to help residents and business owners in Chester County recover from the recent storms and flooding.

Beginning today, the center will be open seven days a week from 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. According to FEMA Public Affairs Officer Mike Wade, the center will remain open at these times until residents’ needs are met. Hours will then be scaled back as necessary. Wade said the center was established as a result of Hurricane Irene and Tropical Storm Lee. The commonwealth requested an Individual Assistance Declaration for multiple counties in the state affected by the storms.

Pennsylvania counties approved for individual assistance include Bucks, Chester, Delaware, Lehigh, Luzerne, Monroe, Montgomery, Northampton, Philadelphia, Sullivan and Wyoming. FEMA recommends that residents interested in services should register beforehand so that any questions about the application process can be answered face to face. Wade said registration will take about 15 minutes and can be completed online at www.disasterassistance.gov or by phone at 800-621-3362.

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How prepared is Chester County for a terrorist attack?

WASHINGTON (Sept. 11, 2007) - A memorial flag ...

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Fundamentally, the work done by those men and women who help facilitate the efforts of Chester County’s fire, police, and emergency medical departments has changed very little, if at all, since the morning of Sept. 11, 2001. Call takers answer 9-1-1 phone calls from people who are experiencing problems. They pass the information along to a dispatcher, who contacts the necessary responders. Overseeing this, the supervisors make sure that all runs smoothly and residents get the care and protection they need. Those conditions existed 10 years ago, and will likely be in place 10 years from now.

But two men who help coordinate the efforts of the Chester County Department of Emergency Services (DES) said in a combined interview recently that to believe that their jobs have not been affected by the events of that day of attack would be to miss a broader message. The job of emergency management personnel in the county is both more focused and more diverse now that it was before the Sept. 11, 2001, attacks in New York City, Washington, D.C., and western Pennsylvania, say John Haynes and Robert Kagel. What has happened in the field since that day has allowed the DES to handle the catastrophes it has faced since — record snowfalls, earthquakes, and most recently, Hurricane Irene — in ways the two could only have dreamed about in the days prior.

Haynes, DES’ deputy director of 9-1-1 operations, Kagel, DES deputy director for emergency management, share a combined 50 years of experience in the emergency management field, 31 years in Chester County. Speaking with a reporter, they said the job duties of 9-1-1 and emergency management personnel have not changed since Sept. 11, 2001, although the technology and training they get may have.
“What has changed is the expectations and concerns” of county residents, Haynes said. “The mindset of our citizens has changed somewhat in that what on Sept. 9, 2001, would not have raised an eyebrow, now results in a telephone call” — although he acknowledged that the number and urgency of those calls has diminished somewhat in the intervening years as residents “tempered themselves.” To view the full article visit dailylocal.com or click here.

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The Aftermath of Hurricane Irene

The eye of Hurricane Isabel approaches North C...

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The storm left millions without power across much of the Eastern Seaboard, left at least two dozen dead and forced airlines to cancel about 9,000 flights. It never became the big-city nightmare forecasters and public officials had warned about, but it still had the ability to surprise. Many of the worst effects arose from rains that fell inland, not the highly anticipated storm surge along the coasts. Residents of Pennsylvania and New Jersey nervously watched waters rise as hours’ worth of rain funneled into rivers and creeks. Nearly 5 million homes and businesses lost power at some point during the storm. Lights started to come back on for many on Sunday, though it was expected to take days for electricity to be fully restored.

In an early estimate, consulting firm Kinetic Analysis Corp. figured total losses from the storm at $7 billion, with insured losses of $2 billion to $3 billion. The storm will take a bite out of Labor Day tourist business from the Outer Banks to the Jersey Shore to Cape Cod. Irene was the first hurricane to make landfall in the continental United States since 2008, and came almost six years to the day after Katrina ravaged New Orleans on Aug. 29, 2005. For questions regarding insurance and seeing if you are covered properly visit http://www.kimberleyvassal.com

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Hurricane Irene is Coming

The full force of Hurricane Irene was still a day away from the East Coast but heightened waves began hitting North Carolina’s Outer Banks early Friday as the storm continued trudging toward the U.S., where it threatened a region that isn’t used to seeing hurricanes. For hundreds of miles, as many as 65 million people along the densely populated East Coast warily waited Friday for a dangerous hurricane that has the potential to inflict billions of dollars in damages anywhere within that urban sprawl that arcs from Washington and Baltimore through Philadelphia, New York, Boston and beyond. Below is a video of some safety tips to remember!

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